Ian Gallacher

Biography

Here is his bio from the Syracuse University website: “Professor Gallacher received a bachelor’s degree in music, with honors, from the University of Leeds, a master of fine arts degree in orchestral conducting from Carnegie-Mellon University, and a juris doctor from the Washington College of Law.  He clerked for two years for United States District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin, and then practiced complex civil litigation in Baltimore as an associate and later as a partner at Goodell, DeVries, Leech, and Dann, LLP. In 2002, he returned to the Washington College of Law, first as an instructor and then as Associate Director of Legal Rhetoric. He joined the College of Law faculty in 2004.  Professor Gallacher has written about issues flowing from class action litigation and is also the author of the books, A Form and Style Manual for Lawyers and A Form and Style Manual for Paralegals.” This merely begins to scratch the surface of Ian's multifaceted personality. He sent me his current CV, which includes the following things: 1971: Hean Findlay Award for Scots Fiddle Playing, Edinburgh Music Competition 1975-77: Music Director and Conductor, University of Leeds Symphony Orchestra 1978-84: Violist, McKeesport and Westmoreland Symphonies 1980: Actor and Violinist, George Romero Movie “Knightriders” 1981-84: Pittsburgh Ballet/Opera Orchestra 1983: Guest Conductor, The Pittsburgh Camerata 1993, 1996: Fiddling Champion, Alexandria Virginia Highland Games There’s a list as long as your arm of conference presentations and papers in the field of law as well. My favorites are ones which combine music and law, such as "The Beggar's Opera and its Criminal Law Context" which "seeks to take the characters and situations of Gay's The Beggar's Opera and consider how closely the play's portrayal matches the historical record. Although the view offered by the play is a restricted one, the chapter concludes that the picture it offers is as close to historical reality as any other document from the period." I have always felt that people who deal with choruses would make good lawyers, as you get lots of practice attempting to persuade people to do things via logical argument. In Ian's case it is obviously true...